Tips for Strong Evidence Writing

In past blog posts, I’ve talked about the MEAL plan, and the importance of using evidence (the e from MEAL) from empirical research; However, in literature reviews there are specific skills related to presenting that evidence that you need to add to your writing tool belt. These include writing sentences that show rather than tell, and writing densely cited sentences to show the larger landscape of a topic.

Screen Shot 2017-12-13 at 6.05.02 PM

Show Versus Tell

In courses, you likely cited studies very generally to help you make a point. However, when you write about studies in the background section of your prospectus or within the literature review, you should avoid generalized references that tell about studies and instead show the evidence by sharing details about the study and specific results. Therefore, the following phrases should not be used in a literature review.

  • Researchers have found….
  • Research states….

In a previous post I shared this formula:

In this (methodology) study + data collection methods/participants = results.

Here are some ways this formula can be used.

Telling: Researchers found that boys were more likely to fail geometry than were girls (Smith & Wesson, 2015).

Allow Data to Show (Better): In a quantitative study of urban high school sophomores, Smith and Wesson (2015) found that girls (n = 135) were nearly twice as likely as boys (n = 110) to fail geometry (p < .05). Continue reading

Advertisements